11 August 2019

Fort de Troyon

Fort de Troyon - André Ruiter Photography

When searching for stereoviews to extend my collection, I always pay special attention to images of sites I’ve visited while working on my photo projects. I was delighted to found a slide of Fort de Troyon. It brings back good memories of my visit to this fort in 2015.

28 July 2019

Vues de Guerre

Category: Stereoscopy   Tags: Stereoviews / WWI
Vues de Guerre - André Ruiter Photography

The majority of French stereoviews from the First World War are not rare. They were produced in large numbers and are offered on many online auction sites. Much less is known about the photographers, manufacturers and sellers. That's why simple documents can sometimes reveal valuable information.

21 July 2019

La Stéréoscopie Universelle

Category: Stereoscopy   Tags: LSU / SDV / Stereoviews / WWI
La Stéréoscopie Universelle - André Ruiter Photography

I’m collecting glass stereoviews since 2018. It started with the purchase of individual slides with images of the Battle of Verdun. My collection started to grow with the acquisition of a lot with 144 stereoviews in 6x13 format. All slides are from the same manufacturer: La Stéréoscopie Universelle, abbreviated LSU.

19 July 2019

Saving Paris

Category: Stereoscopy   Tags: Jules Richard / Stereoviews / WWI
Saving Paris - André Ruiter Photography

I've added 23 glass stereoviews to my collection of images from the First World War. This time no trenches, soldiers or destruction. These images show the monuments of Paris, covered by sandbags to protect them against enemy fire.

16 March 2019

Feste Bleibtreu

Le Pain de Sucre, Vosges, France
Category: Historic Landscapes   Tags: WWI
Feste Bleibtreu - André Ruiter Photography

During World War I, the German army used the peaks in the Vosges Mountains as observation posts. Le Pain de Sucre is a rock formation at 671 meters near the village of Celles-Sur-Plaine. It dominates the Vallée de La Plaine and faces Col de la Chapelotte. The Germans strengthened its position with fortifications and called it “Feste Bleibtreu”, named after one of its commanding officers.

On 1 August 1916, French troops tried to conquer the peak. The distance to the top is only one kilometre, but the steep slopes proved very difficult terrain. The German defenders soon noticed the French progressing through the barbwire and they bombed them with grenades. Under heavy fire, the French commander ordered to retreat.